JoAnn Asselin | Westfield Real Estate, Agawam Real Estate, West Springfield Real Estate


A good home office considers everything from lighting to air quality to layout, but even the best of the best home offices should be reimagined from time to time. So what happens when you switch up your office layout? The results may surprise you. Here are a few quick tips for redesigning your home office space.

Rework Assessment 

Most people will reconfigure their desks or buy a new piece of furniture whenever they think it’s time. Take a second to notice your office every quarter or so, because it gives you the chance to evaluate what’s working and what isn’t. Is your back hurting more after you bought that new chair? Did you recently read an article about the benefits of a standing desk? Would you prefer glancing out a different window of your home?

Outdated Equipment

When redesigning your home office, throw your technology in the mix. Storage needs change as we get deeper into our work. We may need a new computer or tech that harmonizes with our smartphones versus existing outside of them. Has your spacial need changed? Perhaps you want to opt for a vertical monitor layout instead of a horizontal one.

Remember that equipment is just as important as furniture when working from home. It’s always a good idea to update software and hardware to ensure everything works as seamlessly as possible before you simply replace any electronic equipment.

Redesign the Atmosphere 

The home office is a place to get things done, but that doesn’t mean it has to be a cold or unwelcoming place. From light diffusers to scent diffusers, there are ways to create energy in the space that works for you (and your boss).

So if you’re dragging your heels in the morning, consider energizing essential oils like oranges or peppermint. Or add another more comfortable chair other than your office chair if you need space to brainstorm or review dry documents. 

There’s a lot to be said for keeping up with a home office. Even if it’s not always the most exciting room in the home, it can certainly be the one that helps you stay on top of everything that needs to get done. 


This Single-Family in East Longmeadow, MA recently sold for $245,000. This Ranch style home was sold by JoAnn Asselin - Witalisz & Associates, Inc..


103 Prospect St, East Longmeadow, MA 01028

Single-Family

$234,900
Price
$245,000
Sale Price

5
Rooms
3
Beds
2
Baths
This nice 3 Bedroom Ranch is very conveniently located and close to everything! It has been freshly repainted in neutral colors throughout. There are HW floors in most of the rooms. The Kitchen has granite counters, modern cabinets and ceramic floor, all about ten years old. The Basement is partially finished (also freshly painted walls and floor) adding additional living area for your enjoyment. The smaller finished room would make a great Home Office and the larger room is perfect for a Play Room or TV Room. Gas Furnace and Water Heater were replaced about 10 years ago. Relax on the attached Rear Deck that overlooks a large fenced in back yard. At the rear of the house there is a storage shed for tools, lawn mower etc which also has electricity. This home has a lot to offer, come take a look.

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Let's face it – no condo seller wants to deal with a high-pressure negotiation. Lucky for you, we're here to help you streamline the process of selling your condo so you can avoid stressful negotiations with property buyers.

What does it take to remain calm, cool and collected during a negotiation with a condo buyer? Here are three tips that every condo seller needs to know.

1. Consider the Condo Buyer's Perspective

As an informed condo seller, it is important to consider both sides of a negotiation. By doing so, you can evaluate a condo buyer's perspective and plan your next move accordingly.

For condo sellers, the goal is to get the best price for a property. As such, a condo seller who performs extensive housing market research probably understands the true value of his or her residence.

On the other hand, a condo buyer is likely to conduct real estate market research on his or her own. This property buyer also will assess the current condition of a condo in relation to his or her budget and submit an offer that accounts for these factors.

Ultimately, a condo seller and buyer should try to find common ground. That way, both parties can work together to get the best results out of a negotiation.

2. Review All of Your Options

After a condo seller accepts a buyer's proposal, the next step likely involves a property inspection. At this point, a condo acquisition may move forward, or a condo seller might need to rethink his or her plan.

If a condo inspector discovers myriad problems with a property, a condo buyer may ask the seller to complete repairs or lower the price of the property. Meanwhile, a condo seller will need to review all of his or her options quickly.

Following a condo inspection, it is important to consider the results of the evaluation.

If a condo seller discovers major repairs are required, he or she should consider completing the repairs or lowering the price on a property.

Or, if a condo buyer asks for a major price reduction even though only minimal repairs are needed, a seller should be unafraid to say "No" to the buyer's requests.

It is important for a condo seller to feel comfortable with any decision that is made throughout the property selling cycle. Thus, if a condo seller is uncomfortable with completing property repairs or reducing the price of a residence after a property inspection, he or she should be ready to decline a buyer's demands.

3. Consult with a Real Estate Agent

A real estate agent will handle negotiations between a condo seller and buyer. Therefore, this housing market professional can play a pivotal role in a seller's ability to get the best price for a condo.

Consulting with a real estate agent who possesses condo experience is key. This real estate agent can keep you up to date during negotiations with condo buyers and ensure you are fully satisfied with the final results.

Take advantage of the aforementioned tips, and you can move one step closer to maximizing the value of your condo.


Many foreclosures are often sold “as is” and require some work. The seller may also be more open to negotiating a lower price based on the number of repairs that need to be done. You could save quite a bit of money if you can do a lot of the work yourself.

Special Loans

Some lenders have loan programs that are specifically for fixer-uppers. They lend you the amount needed to purchase the home and extra money to make repairs to the house. However, you will have to follow the lender’s rules. The rules vary from lender to lender, but could include:

  • Doing a percentage of the work yourself

  • Living on the property

  • Completing a portion of the work within a specific amount of time.

If you are required to live on the property, you could set up an RV or live in a section of the house that doesn’t need extensive repairs. You could even convert an outbuilding to an in-law apartment.

Know What Has to Be Done

Before you commit to a loan with terms for extra money to fix up a home, go through the house to make a list of everything that absolutely must be done. You might make a second list of things that you would like to do that do not stop you from living in the house.

Determine the costs of the “must-do” repairs to make sure you have enough money to make those repairs. Then, estimate the time it will take you to make those repairs.

Once you determine that you have enough money to at least get the house habitable and can do it within the lender’s terms, you are ready to make a bid!


Photo by Arek Socha via Pixabay 

In a bid to afford homes in high-value areas, many homeowners turn to income from short-term rentals to cover a high mortgage payment. You can benefit from this option with some caveats:

  • Location really matters. A lot. You might advertise your home as near the coast when it’s really 20 miles inland and get a few bites. But eventually, the reviews catch up with you, and you lose out. Be honest about where your rental sits. Market what is available: access to public transportation, quiet parks, sports arenas, theme parks, etc. only if they truly are accessible.
  • Consider hosting rather than leaving your home to strangers. That means you stay on the property while they are there. You’re in control of who comes and goes. Your renters can’t sneak in a dozen of their buddies without paying for them.
  • Make sure your HOA and municipality allow it. Many homeowners associations explicitly forbid subletting or short-term rentals, so if that’s your plan, read those pesky covenants, conditions and restrictions (CCR’s) before you buy. Municipalities also have codes regarding hospitality properties. Many require licenses, permits or fees, and some require occupancy taxes on the nights guests rent your home.
  • Your homeowners’ insurance coverage may not protect you from damage or liability when you’re using your home as a business. Talk to your insurance agent before you post your home online and pay the extra premiums to make certain you’re covered.

Before you decide to turn your home into a short-term rental, know the rules and the risks or the rewards may not be worth the trouble. Your real estate professional is your best resource for discovering properties in your area suitable for a short-term rental, so make that phone call today.